52.6 F
New York
Sunday, October 24, 2021
- Advertisement -spot_img

TAG

Oscar Blayton

COMMENTARY: The Semantics of “Semite

Language and the use of words can be more powerful than any weapon of mass destruction.  “Wordsmithing” in the wrong hands can bring on a plague of violence and destruction biblical in proportions. And this brings us to the current widest widely use of the word “anti-Semitism.”  Donald Trump, a master of obfuscation and prevarication, in order to gin up his evangelical support, signed an executive order on Dec. 11 titled “Executive Order on Combating Anti-Semitism.” Despite its humanistic title, this order does not combat anti-Semitism. It is merely meant to throttle free speech concerning human rights issues in Israel and many individuals, including Jews, have concerns about it.  In a recent opinion piece in The Guardian, Kenneth Stern, the director of the Bard Center for the Study of Hate, wrote, “ was never intended to be a campus hate speech code, but that’s what Donald Trump’s executive order accomplished this week. This order is an attack on academic freedom and free speech, and will harm not only pro-Palestinian advocates, but also Jewish students and faculty, and the academy itself.”  Fifteen years prior to writing his piece in The Guardian, Stern – considered an expert on the topic – drafted a working definition of anti-Semitism for the American Jewish Committee.  It is usually a “third rail” in domestic political discourse for non-Jews to analyze the use of the word “anti-Semitism” in America. But the intentional division of the many and varied identities in this country is now reaching a critical point and the weaponizing of language by demagogues like Donald Trump is throwing fuel on the fire.  Language is generally considered to be a convention, where those who communicate understand a word or phrase to have a commonly understood meaning. And in this sense, anti-Semitism is generally understood in America to mean hostility to or prejudice against Jews.  However, most dictionaries tell us that Semites are not solely Jews, but any of “a number of peoples of ancient southwestern Asia including the Akkadians, Phoenicians, Hebrews and Arabs.”  This has been a working definition since 1848.  Donald Trump is not so concerned with the protection of Jews as he claimed when signing this order. He is more concerned with the division of Americans into “us” and “them.”  It is convenient for him to weaponize the term “anti-Semitism” in order to demonize the supporters of other Semitic people, such as Palestinians, who criticize the actions of the government of Israel. This is a distortion of cultural identity in order to curb the freedom of political speech, the aim of which is to homogenize America into a white Christian nation.  Joining the ranks of those who want to divide this nation in order homogenize it are bigoted religious leaders like Robert Jeffress, senior pastor of First Baptist Church, Dallas, and the Rev. John C. Hagee, founder of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, who is known for his end-times preaching. Despite their histories of religious intolerance, both of these vendors of religious hate were guests at the White House’s Hanukkah party, which took place after the signing ceremony for the executive order. Jeffress is known for postulating that Jews and other non-Christians are destined for hell while Hagee has called Hitler a “half-breed Jew” who was a “hunter” fulfilling God’s will. Can we really believe that Trump is concerned with hate speech when he pals around with people like Jeffress and Hagee? Can we believe he wants to stamp out hate speech when he has said there were “very fine people” protesting in Charlottesville, Va., by torchlight shouting “Jews shall not replace us”?   America, in a sense, is a small village where we all drink from a common well of democracy that springs from mutual respect and the common good. Trump and his minions are poisoning that well with the toxic wordsmithing of hate speech. He schemes to turn this country into a white Christian monolith, while falsely accusing the intended victims of his bigotry of being the perpetrators of villainy.   If we, as Americans, are concerned about injustices towards Semitic people, we should approach it in terms of all Semitic people, including the descendants of the Akkadians, Phoenicians, Hebrews and Arabs. These times are telling as to who the American people are and what they stand for. And while actions speak louder than words, the words we use have a lot to say about us as well. We should not allow legitimate criticism to be muted by those falsely claiming to muzzle hate speech.  Oscar H. Blayton is a former Marine Corps combat pilot and human rights activist who practices law in Virginia. ​ 

COMMENTARY: Brace Yourself

As the Titanic was sinking after colliding with an iceberg in 1912, the poor among the passengers, trapped below deck, were drowning as the...

COMMENTARY: This Race is Ours to Lose

When Sputnik circled the earth in 1957, Americans were agog that the Russians had beaten us into space.  In Black barbershops, segregated classrooms of the South and other spaces where Black folk could speak openly, it was undisputed that America’s inability to focus on the “space race” was because of its obsession with the “race question.” Three years earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that the doctrine of “separate but equal” was unconstitutional and one year after that, the Court had ordered the desegregation of public school with “all deliberate speed.”  These directives for fairness and equality for African Americans set the South ablaze and racial bigots raised every imaginable barricade to prevent equal educational opportunities for Black children.  Some people will say that desegregation had nothing to do with the space race.  But the number of Black astronauts, physicists, engineers and mathematicians who have contributed to America’s space efforts since integration exposes that bit of white supremacy for what it is.  Prohibiting African Americans from attending many universities with advanced science programs, and participating fairly in the aerospace industry and the effort to conquer space, amputated a valuable portion of this nation’s brain power.  Today, we again find ourselves in competition with Russia on another geopolitical chessboard. Russia, Brazil, India and China have pushed forward on the global...

COMMENTARY: A Matter Of Life And Death

All oppressed people know this feeling. Tevye expressed it best in “Fiddler on the Roof” when he said there are times “when our hearts...

COMMENTARY: A Fair Shot in America

Felicity Huffman says she just wanted to give her daughter "a fair shot" at getting into the college of her choice. That is the...

COMMENTARY: 2016 – 2.0 Is Not Good Enough

It’s déjà vu all over again. The defeat of the Democratic presidential candidate in 2016 was crushing, and many reasons have been given for why...

COMMENTARY: Black Women Are Incarcerated For The Crime Of Poverty

It seems like every day we learn about another facet of the cruelty of the American criminal justice system.  Ava DuVernay’s blockbuster documentary on Netflix, When...

COMMENTARY: The Debts We Owe Haitians

On Oct. 9, 1779, more than 500 Haitian soldiers (referred to as “Les Chasseurs-Volontaires de Saint-Domingue”) fought alongside French troops to aid the Americans...

Boycott Trump

The public shaming of White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Saunders, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and other Trump minions has had an impact upon members of 45’s administration. The...

COMMENTARY: Crimes Without Punishment

And again, a white police officer has killed a person of color with impunity. On Sept. 16, 2016 Tulsa police officer Betty Jo Shelby shot...

Latest news

- Advertisement -spot_img